Seventh Heaven
By: Beck Hansen, Greg Kurstin

Written by: Beck Hansen, Greg Kurstin

Versions:
  1. Seventh Heaven
    Available on Colors.
    Credits
    Serban Ghenea: Mix
    Beck Hansen: Producer, Vocals
    Greg Kurstin: Producer
    Roger Joseph Manning Jr.: Vocals (Background)
 
Lyrics:
Seventh Heaven [Version (a)]:

I want to see you
With the pharaoh's curse
The apple flower doggerel
The batteries burst
And I'm out in the city
In the typical noise
In the suntan ellipse
And the filigree of energy
What you want and what you need
When I'm down on my knees
With my pocket full of widows
You can do it down here
What you never did there
When you feel untethered
From the broken veneer

Don't tell nobody I'm here
Don't tell nobody I'm here
Now I'm far from the world
In your seventh heaven
Now I'm far from the world
In your seventh heaven

Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know
Or you got to let me go

I'm gonna take it with me
I'm gonna take it with me
I'm gonna take it with me
I'm gonna take it down
Take it down with me

A second language
A burden of hope
I've seen it all come clean
Like a guillotine rose
A photograph
A low life laugh
We'll shoot for the empire
Land in the dustpile
I want to wake up
In the shadow of a fever pitch
With the gold glass heart
Sending messages
I hear the voice over the phone
She pauses
Says "I'll never never never go"

Oh can I stay here with you?
Oh can I stay here with you?
Now I'm dead to the world
In your seventh heaven
Now I'm dead to the world
In your seventh heaven

Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know

I'm gonna take it with me

Someday there might be something better
You can change your mind but you can't forget her
Someday there might be something better
You can change your mind but you can't forget her

So let it rise to the highest high
In the satellite sky
So let it rise to the highest high
In the satellite sky
Up to the seventh heaven
The seventh heaven
So let it rise rise rise
To the highest height
In the satellite sky

Now I'm starting to fall
From your seventh heaven
Now I'm starting to fall
From your seventh heaven

Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know
Now you got to let me know
Or you got to let me go

Love a love a love a love
Love a love a love a love
Love a love a love a love
Love a love a love a love
 
The Song:

"Seventh Heaven" was reported first in a preview of Beck's upcoming October 2016 album, which ended up delayed a year before being release as Colors in October 2017.

Beck has referred to "Seventh Heaven" as about "a man wailing out at his love who has left him." That of course makes the song deeper: is this love? Obsession? A bit of both, probably. Beck has used this duplicity to shade his 'love' songs in the past ("Think I'm In Love," "Blackbird Chain," for two). Regardless, the verses seem to track the story somewhat vaguely. The first verse begins with Beck announcing "I want to see you," and wandering the city. The second verse seems to expressing some brief hope, but it all ends with his love rejecting him on the phone.

Beck's verses here are a little wordy, and not straight-forward to decipher, but they contrast quite nicely with the clarity of the chorus (and their gorgeous melodies). Beck says that the album is an album about connecting; "Seventh Heaven" seems to be about an attempt to connect with someone.

The song shimmers, on a very simple bed of funky rhythm and insistent electric guitar. There are some lovely but unobtrusive new age-y cascading details to the song too (ie., the intro).

Also interesting is the construction of the song. After the verses, Beck does a pre-chorus ("don't tell nobody I'm here"), the chorus, and a post-chorus ("now you got to let me know"). A bridge connects the first and second verse ("I'm gonna take it with me").

After the second chorus though, Beck decides to stop repeating himself. The bridge is done instrumentally, and instead of connecting to a third verse, it sort of goes into a great new replacement section ("someday there might be something better / you can change your mind but you can't forget her": a terrific couplet).

That replacement verse leads into a replacement pre-chorus, where he's singing about the hopefulness of love ("let it rise to the highest high in the satellite sky").

These new sections have great affect on the song: they allow none of the (superb) melodies from overstaying their welcome, and are also just as interesting in their own right. Beck has done experimenting with song construction throughout his career, and here on Colors, even being seen as a straight-forward pop record by most, he is still providing some twists. It may not be as random or collage-like as in the past, but he continues to come at his songwriting creatively.